3/30/2013

Design Build Update on Shady Jacks Saloon New Bar Design

Both the Owner and Myself were very satisfied with both the design and build of the New Bar Design for Shady Jacks Saloon and Deli in Downtown StLouis MO.


The first photo in this green blog post is the final CAD drawing of the project after the Waitress Station and Center Shelving was added to the project.

Previous CAD Photos and details:


Waitress Station and Center Shelving Added to the Design Build Project-Shady Jacks Saloon New Bar Design
Waitress Station and Center Shelving Added to the Design Build Project 

Before the Waitress Station was added to the New Bar Design-Scotts Contracting St Louis MO
Before the Waitress Station was added to the New Bar Design 

Shady Jacks Saloon-New Bar and Waitress Station-Stocked and Loaded and Ready to Serve
Shady Jacks Saloon-New Bar and Waitress Station-Stocked and Loaded and Ready to Serve 

Waitress Station for the New Bar Design at Shady Jacks Saloon-Designed and Built by Scotts Contracting, St Louis MO
Waitress Station for the New Bar Design at Shady Jacks Saloon 

Here's what people are saying about the New Bar Design:


  • Patrons:

    • Love the New Look- Natural Looking  
    • Makes the Bar Look Bigger
    • Design Blends with the Asthetics of the Bar
    • Faster Drink Orders from Staff

  • Bartenders:

    • New Bar Design is User Friendly 
    • Easier Access to Supplies  
    • Able to Fill Customer Orders Faster and Efficiently!

  • Waitress Staff:

    • Easier Access to Needed Supplies
    • User Friendly
    • Makes Filling Drink Orders Faster (which increases their TIPS!)

  • From the Owner-Shady Jack:

    • New Design Opens the Bar up and makes it look bigger
    • User Friendly Design helps bartenders to better handle the customers orders
    • Functionality was added to the project for access to the New Beverage Dispensors
    • Very Pleased with the: Natural Look, Functionality, and Form

Here are the main goals of the project that were accomplished from the New Bar Design:



  1. Added Spots for the New Beverage Dispensers and Coolers
  2. Functionality for the Bartenders to meet the the increased customer base
  3. Any Additions must Blend in with Current Surroundings!
Here's what made this a True Green Build Project-All the Lumber was either from waste leftover from a Lumber Mill in the St Louis Area or Up-cycled from previous buildings in the St Louis Area


Come View the Bars New Design for yourself at Shady Jacks Saloon and Deli-1432 NBROADWAY DOWNTOWN, STLOUIS MO 2 BLOCKS NORTH OF LUMIERE CASINO. THE ORIGINAL BIKER BAR! OVER 16 YEARS OF BUSINESS. see map


4/1/2013 Some of the Lumber was purchased from: Bruce at American Timber Salvage Inc-2100 N 2nd Street St Louis MO 63102

Thank you for stopping by St Louis Renewable Energy. Feel free to comment in the section below or contact Scotts Contracting- St Louis Home Improvement Projects and Energy Reducing Needs Get Your Green Building Tips and Resources at St Louis Renewable Energy Green Blog

Renewable Energy-Energy Conservation and MO Legislative Update-

We need more petition signers for the RES Complaint!

In case you missed it, our state's renewable energy standard is being ignored by the utilities. We filed a complaint last month, asking the government to make them comply and we'd like your voice in there with us. So far, we've got 500 out of our goal of 3,000 signers. Please help us create the renewable energy we voted for by signing our petition.
sign-button


Legislative Update

Seven weeks remain in the 2013 legislative session, and you might be curious what bills we're watching. If you haven't called up your legislator, there's some good bills and some bad ones to talk about now. So here are the proposed efficiency and renewables legislation that we've got our eyes on:

OPPOSED Bills:
  • HB 44 - Allows hydropower produced in any quantity to be used to satisfy the renewable energy standard
    • Sponsor: Bart Korman, House District 42
    • Last Action: 3/07/2013 - Second read and referred: Senate Commerce, Consumer Protection, Energy, and the Environment
    • Why we oppose: Allowing old hydro damns to count toward the RES would gut the RES resulting in no new renewable generation. 
SUPPORTED Bills:
  • SB 398 - Extends the expiration of an income tax deduction for energy efficiency audits and projects to December 31, 2019
    • Sponsor: Jason Holsman, Senate District 7
    • Last Action - 4/4/2013 - Senate hearing scheduled
    • Why we support: This act encourages investment in the best and cheapest source of energy – efficiency.
  • SB 277 - Establishes the Missouri Energy Efficiency Performance Standard
    • Sponsor: Jason Holsman, Senate District 7
    • Last Action - 2/20/2013 - Second Read and Referred S Commerce, Consumer Protection, Energy and the Environment Committee
    • Why we support: This act would require mandatory energy efficiency measures by electrical corporations, gas corporations, municipals utilities, and rural electrical cooperatives to reach specified energy savings as dictated by the PSC, resulting in MO becoming a leading state in EE. 
  • SB 299 - Establishes the Capital Green Program to provide funding for energy efficiency improvements to certain state buildings
    • Sponsor: Jason Holsman, Senate District 7
    • Last Action - 2/26/2013 - Hearing Conducted Commerce, Consumer Protection, Energy and the Environment Committee
    • Why we support: This act would provide funding for energy efficiency improvements including geothermal, wind, and solar energy resources to certain state buildings.
  • SB 368 - Prohibits certain property associations from barring the installation of solar energy systems
    • Sponsor: Jason Holsman, Senate District 7
    • Last Action - 2/28/2013 - Second Read and Referred to Commerce, Consumer Protection, Energy and the Environment Committee
    • Why we support: Under this act, the adoption of a bylaw or exercise of any power by the governing entity of an association prohibiting the installation of a solar energy system is expressly prohibited.
  • SB 400 - Modifies provisions relating to the renewable energy standard
    • Sponsor: Jason Holsman, Senate District 7
    • Last Action - 3/13/2013 - Second Read and Referred Commerce, Consumer Protection, Energy and the Environment Committee
    • Why we support: This act reinstates the requirement that  renewable energy credits are generated from renewable energy sources and that has been sold as power to Missouri energy consumers.
sign-button


3/28/2013

Climate Change Series: The Future Of Fossil Fuels | Cognoscenti

Scotts Contracting, St Louis Renewable Energy strongly urges you the reader to read between the lines on this article.  Especially since the interview seems to be based on: Fossil Fuel Supporters

Here's some of the info that I found lacking in true clarity:

  1. Natural Gas: Methane Released into the Atmosphere from Fracking
  2. Natural Gas Exports are increasing thus creating more Demand for Natural Gas- which will translate into higher prices- Its cheaper now but will it remain cheaper in the Future?
  3. All three interviewees do not provide True Renewable Energy Stats in which their testimonies are based on.



Climate Change Series: The Future Of Fossil Fuels

  •  
  • by Mike Jesanis, Cutler Cleveland and N. Jonathan Peress
  •  
  • 1


Brayton Point Power Station in Somerset, Massachusetts (Mr. Ducke/flickr)
Introduction
Over the past 250 years, we have become increasingly reliant on fossil fuels. Coal, oil and natural gas powered the industrial and technological revolutions and to this day remain the world’s most dominant source of energy.
But when fossil fuels are burned to create energy, they release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which contributes to global warming. Indeed, fossil fuels produce the majority of the world’s greenhouse gases and are a huge driver of climate change. Stocks are also far from infinite. Aside from the environmental concerns, we will eventually run out.
Our dependence is causing us problems — and it needs to be addressed immediately.
Utility executive Mike Jesanis, Boston University professor Cutler Cleveland and environmental attorney N. Jonathan Peress discuss the future of fossil fuels.
jesanis edit
The former president and CEO of National Grid USA, Mike Jesanis is an adviser to companies, governments, and non-profits in traditional and emerging energy fields.
After the oil embargoes of 1970s, New England Electric System (NEES) converted six of its eight large oil-fired plants to coal and bought a coal-fired ship to supply them. For this decision — along with energy efficiency investments — NEES won national acclaim for its bold, forward-thinking business strategy. When deregulation hit the oil and natural gas industries in the mid-1980s, prices for those fuels plummeted, and those of us at NEES saw our bold, forward-thinking investments lose half their value, virtually overnight.
That early experience taught me a valuable lesson: Disruptive change in the energy industry is primarily driven by economics. Political and environmental events such as the 2003 East Coast blackout, or hurricanes like Katrina and Sandy may temporarily garner headlines, but they tend not to result in major changes.
What we’ve seen in recent years is a confluence of factors — primarily, improved technology for horizontal drilling and for hydraulic fracking — that has led to a substantial increase in production and a decrease in the price of natural gas from shale.
Disruptive change in the energy industry is primarily driven by economics. Political and environmental events such as the 2003 East Coast blackout, or hurricanes like Katrina and Sandy may temporarily garner headlines, but they tend not to result in major changes.
From 1970 to 1990, natural gas reserves in the U.S. fell by half. In the last 5 to8 years, all of those reserves have been replenished thanks to new, improved technologies. Industry estimates now project that the U.S. has at least 100 years worth of natural gas reserves, and that within 20 years half of U.S. natural gas production will be from shale. Put simply, large quantities of cheap, available natural gas from shale is a game-changer for the U.S. energy industry.
The first loser in this new marketplace is nuclear power. Exelon, the nation’s premiere nuclear power plant operator, has lost about two-thirds of its market value since 2008. The second loser is coal. Coal plants simply can’t compete with natural gas, both in New England and across the country. PJM, the power grid system operator for the mid-Atlantic region, just announced that it is retiring the equivalent of 15,000 megawatts of coal-fired power plants. Environmentalists and the EPA tried for decades, and failed to shut down many of those plants. Natural gas got it done.
New energy technologies — whether nuclear, wind, biomass or solar — are also losers. Because those technologies are now competing against cheap, plentiful natural gas — which is both more economical and less of an environmental issue than coal — the premium paid to adopt those energy sources just got higher.
Low-cost natural gas produces winners, too. According to ISO New England, natural gas now effectively sets the price for electricity generation in the region. With the fall in natural gas prices, since 2008 that has resulted in savings of $7 billion for New England electricity consumers.
Residential customers aren’t the only beneficiaries. Low natural gas prices are now spurring petrochemical companies like the Dow Chemical Company to reinvest in the their domestic research, development and production operations. PwC estimates 1 million U.S. manufacturing jobs will be created in the next decade because of the impact of low natural gas prices.
Pipeline companies, like the company on whose board I sit, also benefit from the boom in natural gas. They are not only laying new pipe; they’re repairing and replacing older pipelines that are more prone to economically wasteful and environmentally damaging leaks.
I don’t think we can imagine all the ways our energy future will change in the coming decades. There’s going to be some development in technology or in markets that will be a game-changer for how we generate and use energy. But for now, increased use of natural gas is the dominant factor changing our energy markets.
cleveland_cutler edit
Editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Energy, Cutler Clevelandis a professor in the department of Earth and Environment at Boston University, and a senior fellow at the National Council for Science and the Environment in Washington D.C., where he serves on the executive board of the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL).
I’m not pro-fossil fuels or anti-fossil fuels, but the consequence of burning fossil fuels has enormous implications for future generations, and I think that has to be front and center in our discussion about what we do with these resources.
There’s a lot of fossil fuel left in the earth’s crust. My estimate, based on a variety of respected sources, is that at current global rates of use, there’s over 1,200 years worth of oil, natural gas and coal that is “technically recoverable” — meaning, we can extract and process it using currently or near-currently available technologies.
What would that mean for the Earth’s atmosphere?
No president since Jimmy Carter has dared talk with the American people about our use of energy. How, and how efficiently, we use energy has to be part of the discussion.
Well, the total carbon content of those fossil fuels is almost 15,000 petagrams (1 petagram equals 1 billion metric tons). Most of that is in coal, but a fair amount is in oil and natural gas, too. By way of comparison, we’ve produced a total of 346 petagrams of carbon emissions worldwide since 1751.  If we put anywhere near that amount of carbon into the atmosphere, we’ll fundamentally alter the planet’s climate system in ways that make the 1 or 2 degree rise of the last century seem almost laughably trivial.
What has to happen to prevent all this carbon from entering the atmosphere? We have to start using non-carbon fuels. And here there’s good news. According to the IPCC, renewable sources of energy — wind, biomass, hydro, geothermal, and especially solar — have the potential to meet and far exceed global electricity demand, both now and in the future.
We face significant barriers in building a low-carbon, renewable energy future. First, there are the enormous — and growing — sunk costs in fossil fuel infrastructure. Second, major energy transitions — from wood to coal, from coal to oil — historically take 30 or more years.
Another major problem is the market sends perverse signals about energy. The environmental and human health externalities — costs not reflected in the price — associated with fossil fuels are staggeringly large. In the case of coal, they exceed the market price. Market signals have to be altered if we want to change this.
The cost of renewables remains a significant barrier to their adoption.  Wind power’s cost is 50 percent higher than combined-cycle natural gas plants. Solar is twice as expensive right now, even though its costs have come way down in the last 20 years. The transition to a green energy future will not be cost free.
Fifteen of the 20 largest corporations in the world sell carbon. Just as tobacco companies spent decades denying the fact that smoking causes lung cancer, these companies have worked furiously to deny the reality of climate change.
Finally, there’s the third rail of American energy politics — the demand side. No president since Jimmy Carter has dared talk with the American people about our use of energy. How, and how efficiently, we use energy has to be part of the discussion.
This is the pre-eminent question we face as a species. And the skids are greased to keep pulling fossil fuels out of the earth’s crust. We have the infrastructure in place to continue burning it. If we’re really concerned about climate, then the changes we need to make will require a level of disruption that makes the shale gas revolution seem tame.
To get serious about climate change requires radical, disruptive change that fundamentally alters the trajectory of human civilization from its present course. That kind of change is possible. The eradication of smallpox, the Green Revolution, and theManhattan Project are just a few recent examples. But it requires a determined, sustained commitment to make it happen.
Peress_NJonathan edit
N. Jonathan Peress is vice president of the Conservation Law Foundation and director of CLF’s clean energy and climate change program.
According to power grid system operator ISO New England, natural gas produced 15 percent of the electricity in New England in 2000. In 2011, natural gas produced 51 percent of the region’s electricity. The rapid growth in market share for natural gas displaced coal and oil power plants. It also helps keep wind, solar and other renewables confined to a small share of the energy market.
This highlights the paradoxical role of natural gas: It’s helping to reduce current carbon emissions in our electric system, while simultaneously delaying our ability to deploy renewable energy sources to reduce future carbon emissions. Natural gas may be on the right side of the “carbon curve” today, but it will be on the wrong side very quickly.
Under existing law, Massachusetts greenhouse gas emissions in the energy system arescheduled to drop 80 percent by 2050. LINK There’s no way– or at least, no known way– to achieve that goal with natural gas as the primary fuel powering our electrical system.
Natural gas is helping to reduce current carbon emissions in our electric system, while simultaneously delaying our ability to deploy renewable energy sources to reduce future carbon emissions.
Traditional analysis shows that natural gas plants are cleaner than oil or coal plants. For example, a typical gas-fired plant releases approximately half as much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as a coal-fired plant.
However, recent life-cycle analysis suggests that reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas
are minimal. A recent study by the National Center for Atmospheric Research concluded “substitution of gas for coal as an energy source results in increased rather than decreased global warming for many decades.”
One of the big issues in that regard is leakage. We actually don’t know how much gas we lose in the system. Cornell Professor Robert Howarth estimates that 3.6 to 7.9 percent of methane is lost through leaks and flaring at the production stage. At the local distribution level, gas companies are compensated for what’s called “lost and unaccounted-for gas,” which can amount to as much as 10 to 12 percent of the natural gas a company brings into the system.
The bottom line is this: Unless leakage rates for new methane can be kept below 2 percent on a life-cycle basis, substituting gas for coal is not an effective way to reduce the magnitude of future climate change.
In the near term, natural gas plays an important role in retiring the dirty, obsolete coal-fired power plants the country has relied on for the last 40 years. But at the Conservation Law Foundation, we think any new fossil fuel investment must be rigorously scrutinized to determine how it will fit in with climate mandates and market realities of the future. New power plants typically run for 30 to 40 years, and new pipelines can last for 80 to 100 years.
In our view, it doesn’t make sense — economically or environmentally — to invest in building new natural gas pipelines and power plants that will be shut down in 10-20 years as we complete the transition to a low-carbon energy future.
There is a more limited role for natural gas to play in future as we decarbonize the power system. The European Climate Foundation concluded that as more variable energy resources (i.e. wind and solar) come online, there needs to be some sort of “firming resource” — power sources that can quickly and reliably be turned on and off — in the system. That’s a role natural gas (and hydropower) can play when the wind stops blowing and the sun isn’t shining brightly.
New England should invest more heavily in energy efficiency, and in repairing leaks and inefficiencies in existing gas pipelines, while also structuring its energy markets, including the services offered in the gas markets, to help spur development of the low-carbon energy system we want and need for the mid-21st century.


Climate Change Series: The Future Of Fossil Fuels | Cognoscenti



Thank you for stopping by St Louis Renewable Energy. Feel free to comment in the section below or contact Scotts Contracting- St Louis Home Improvement Projects and Energy Reducing Needs Get Your Green Building Tips and Resources at St Louis Renewable Energy Green Blog

3/24/2013

Helios Solar Works Features and Benefits

I believe the company went out of business and do not believe the Helios Solar products are available any longer. Added 3/5/14





Helios Solar Works Sales and Installation for the St Louis Region by the Green Pros at Scotts Contracting-St Louis Renewable Energy-http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com/solar.html
Build a Green St Louis using American Made Green and Sustainable http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com/solar.html

6T Series

260-240 Wp

6T Series-Helios Solar Works Sales and Installation for the St Louis Region by the Green Pros at Scotts Contracting-St Louis Renewable Energy-http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com/solar.html

7T2 Series

310-285 Wp

7T2 Series-Helios Solar Works Sales and Installation for the St Louis Region by the Green Pros at Scotts Contracting-St Louis Renewable Energy-http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com/solar.html

9T6 Series

420-390 Wp

9T6 Series-Helios Solar Works Sales and Installation for the St Louis Region by the Green Pros at Scotts Contracting-St Louis Renewable Energy-http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com/solar.html

Helios Solar Works Warranty Information



 Advanced Features of the Helios Solar Works

  • Helios Solar Works modules integrate high-quality mono-crystalline cells, high-transmission glass, and anodized aluminum framing to produce high-efficient and reliable power.


  • Our modules are tested to CEC, IEC, FSEC, TÜV and UL standards and have a Class C fire rating.


  • We offer a generous 25-year linear performance warranty as well as a 10-year workmanship warranty.


  • Our modules are assembled at our headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We strive to source from American suppliers whenever possible to ensure high performance, high quality, and on-time delivery.


                         Check out the Benefits


  • Flexibility. Our high-performance modules make it possible to design systems that satisfy a variety of needs—from residential, commercial, and governmental applications to any project with space or budget constraints.


  • Confidence. Quality is a natural consequence of our material selection and advanced, automated manufacturing platform. This allows you to be confident that our modules will perform as expected for the long term.


  • Affordability. Our advanced, automated manufacturing platform reduces our cost of production, generating savings we pass onto you. Also, systems utilizing our high-performance modules enjoy reduced installation costs, making them some of the most affordable on the market.

9T6 Series

LARGE FORMAT MODULE

Save big by going big..using our 9T6 module will save you time and parts on installation with a greater power yield in the same footprint.



Thank you for stopping by St Louis Renewable Energy. Feel free to comment in the section below or contact Scotts Contracting- St Louis Home Improvement Projects and Energy Reducing Needs Get Your Green Building Tips and Resources at St Louis Renewable Energy Green Blog

3/21/2013

All I request is to be made aware of what is in the food I eat




GMO Seed Conversation-


The More I learn about GMO crops the less and less likely I will buy products produced using GMO Seeds. Scotty





"...lets look at one little Kernel of Corn that was Genetically Modified (GM) to kill any bug that tries to eat it or the Corn plant it grows into. When that little corn grew up it produced 3-4 Ears of Corn with 800 sons and daughters (per ear) that carry this GM bug killer. 

Thats 2,400-3,200 Kernels of corn that could make it to your Dinner plate. 



The Warning of: DO NOT CONSUME- TOXIC, HAZARDOUS,--Do Not Consume-- etc is on every bottle of bug killer. 

Just so you know you are eating the same bug killer that killed the bugs in the field.



In a conversation last weekend. I listened to a theory that suggested the seemingly high rates of Cancer here in StLouis they felt was accelerated by the foods we eat. (As of yet. I have not had enough time to research this theory.) 

---- > All I request is to be made aware of what is in the Foods I eat. Scotty < ----- 


Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)

[ Additional Info as Suggested by: Sean Lintow Sr ]

 Soil bacterium used for biological pest control - produces a crystalline protein toxic to certain types of insects.

zoomBt toxin is produced by Bacillus thuringiensis in an inactive form (protoxin), which is transformed to its active form (delta-endotoxin) in the guts of certain insects. The active toxin binds to receptors in the gut, killing the insect.
Insect pests have long been fought with Bacillus thuringiensis products. Based on the premise that – as opposed to many chemical insecticides – they are harmless to humans, they are used in organic farming.
By means of genetic engineering, the genes for the active agent (Bt toxin) can be transferred from Bt bacteria to plants. There they produce the toxic agent inside the plant cells. In this way, biotechnology has been used to confer insect resistance to a number of economically important crops. Bt maize and Bt cotton are widely grown in several countries.
See also:
 Bt protein; also Bt toxin
 Corn Borer

ps:  


(1)3-4 Ears of Corn= 8oz. 1 Can of Corn

            = 7-8 Ears or 2 Plants.

(2)'lil background:I grew up on a ranch


and have assisted in growing, harvesting,


feeding, and selling- Acres of Corn...."  


via: facebook conversation


Additional Facebook Conversation: 10 Reasons why we don't need GMO Foods 



Thank you for stopping by St Louis Renewable Energy. Feel free to comment in the section below or contact Scotts Contracting- St Louis Home Improvement Projects and Energy Reducing Needs Get Your Green Building Tips and Resources at St Louis Renewable Energy Green Blog

3/18/2013

For All My Wind Energy Enthusiasts

Special Edition Wind Turbine Technology

Topics Covered: Modeling for Better Reliability, Smalley Wind Power Series, Simulating Wind Turbine Effects on Radar Returns, Connector Solutions for Wind Engines, Wind Turbine Slip Rings, Reliable Fiber Optics Solutions for Wind Turbines, Low Wind Turbines on the Rise



GlobalSpec: Wind Turbine Technology Special Edition
Wind Turbine Technology
Home |  Subscriptions |  Past Issues |  Upcoming Events |  On-Demand Events |  Videos | Send to a Friend
Modeling for Better Reliability
Modeling for Better Reliability
Gearboxes fail for many reasons, and determining a root cause is often difficult. As a result, more manufacturers are turning to computer models that can stress a design before it winds up at the top of a tower. Research by the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative shows that useful models need to consider more variables than many people expect. As these additional factors are added, such as housing flexibility, misalignment, and planetary mount movement, predicted reliability goes surprisingly downhill.
DuPont™ Nomex® Energy Solutions Webinar: New Requirements for Electrical Equipment: Why Materials Matter — April 9, 2013
DuPont™ Nomex® Energy Solutions Webinar:
New Requirements for Electrical Equipment: Why Materials Matter — April 9, 2013
On April 9, DuPont™ Nomex® Energy Solutions will present "New Requirements for Electrical Equipment: Why Materials Matter". Learn about emerging requirements for electrical equipment design. Discover the benefits of a total system solution, and more.
Join your peers for this free, informative, and interactive ONLINE webinar — right from the convenience of your desktop. Register today!
Do You Have the Latest Standards?
Do You Have the Latest Standards?
American National Standards Institute, Inc.
ANSI has released a new section of its Web site specifically focused on wind turbine standards. Learn more about wind turbine standards covering topics as far ranging as full-scale structural testing and acoustic noise measurement, as well as a 6-part information model for communications for monitoring and control of wind power plants.
An Ideal Enclosure
An Ideal Enclosure
Fibox Enclosures
Made from polycarbonate for harsh environments Fibox's, ARCA features UL, NEMA 4X/6P and IP 66/67 rating plus CE certification, this enclosure is also available in custom colors matched to PMS, FED STD 595C, or European RAL colors.
European Recession? What Recession?
European Recession? What Recession? Curious about who installed the most turbines in Europe last year? Or what towers are most popular in offshore installations? The European Wind Energy Association's annual report on offshore trends is a valuable source of these and other key technology indicators. Installed generating capacity increased 31% in 2012. Interestingly, the average turbine size remains 4 MW, in spite of the trend to bigger and bigger blades.
Smalley Wind Power Series
Smalley Wind Power
Series
Smalley Steel Ring Company
Smalley is the leading manufacturer of Spirolox Retaining Rings and Wave Springs for the power generation industry. Smalley's standard Wind Power Series is available in up to 120 in. diameters. Standard materials sizes are stocked for production, with delivery in as little as two weeks. Ten-thousand parts are stocked in carbon and stainless steel.
Simulating Wind Turbine Effects on Radar Returns
Simulating Wind Turbine
Effects on Radar Returns
Remcom (USA)
Wind turbines located near radar installations can significantly interfere with a radar's ability to detect its intended targets. Remcom's XGtd software is a high-frequency solver capable of calculating the radar cross section of electrically large objects. In this paper, interference from wind turbines is predicted using XGtd simulations. Download the whitepaper
Connector Solutions for Wind Engines
Connector Solutions for
Wind Engines
Multi-Contact USA
Multi-Contact products suited for wind power plants: Round connectors simplify the connection between wind engine segments on-site. Fork connectors facilitate maintenance processes in the switch gear. Depending on the configuration, the modular connector CombiTac can be used in various parts of the windmill, from the switch case to the nacelle.
Low Wind Turbines on the Rise
Low Wind Turbines on the Rise Fitting the turbine to the environment is no better demonstrated than in Bavaria. With low winds and tall forests, smaller turbines on tall towers are perfect for the heavily forested region. The low wind market segment is heating up for just this reason, according to Wind Power Monthly. GE, Nordex, and other manufacturers are testing this low wind niche with a slew of 2.5 MW turbines.
Wind Turbine Slip Rings
Wind Turbine Slip Rings

United Equipment Accessories,
Inc.
United Equipment Accessories' wind turbine slip rings are engineered to perform up to 75 million revolutions. UEA slip rings offer design versatility and a wide selection of circuitry. Our engineers will work with you on your specific wind turbine application to provide the highest performing quality slip ring available!
Preassembled Substation Control Buildings
Preassembled
Substation
Control Buildings
Trachte, Inc.
Trachte builds high-quality collector and interconnect buildings integrating all the equipment, wiring, and instrumentation needed to support wind farm operations. We have building solutions for wind power customers including wind farm developers, EPC firms, electrical and construction contractors, interconnect utilities, relay and protection panel manufacturers, OEMs, and substation packagers.
Reliable Fiber Optics Solutions for Wind Turbines
Reliable Fiber Optics
Solutions for Wind
Turbines
Avago Technologies
Key applications for industrial fiber optic components in wind turbine systems include: power electronic gate driver for rectifiers and inverters, control and communication boards, turbine control units, condition monitoring systems, and wind farm networking. Learn more...
Tantalizing Teardown
Tantalizing Teardown Every engineer wonders what's wearing out in a working turbine, but how many of us get to tear one apart in the middle of its lifespan? The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory did just that. They ran a 1 kW grid-connected SWIFT turbine for two years, then ripped it apart. There were the usual paint chips and wear marks on the nose cone, but the generator presented more serious issues.
Sweep Twist Improves Performance
Sweep Twist Improves Performance Longer blades mean more power, but at some point weight and torsional stress become limiting factors. Sweep-twist blades shed turbulence loads at the tip, in much the same way whale and porpoise fins reduce drag. Renewable Energy World reports on the Star project, which crafted a prototype sweep-twist blade. In its final 56 m form, it converted turbulence into a 12% power improvement over traditional blades.
Optical Monitors Reduce Stress
Optical Monitors Reduce Stress Monitoring blade stress and wear is critical to an effective operations and maintenance program. Copper strain gauges are typically used for blade load measurement, but they suffer from limited lifetimes and calibration instability. Optical strain gauges offer several advantages, according to this study. It stresses better reliability, cleaner data, and reduced recalibration headaches.
Sandia's Reliability CREW
Sandia's Reliability CREW Is your maintenance and operation team effective? Benchmarking turbine uptime against industry norms is a great way to check your maintenance ROI and spot patterns before they become problems. Luckily, Sandia National Laboratories has done the basic work for you. Their Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database contains a wealth of information on predicted uptime, wind speed and generation calculations, and contributors to turbine unavailability.
The Fight over Inner Space
The Fight over Inner Space For the past 18 months the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has been reviewing clearance issues inside turbine towers. OSHA expects a 30 in. clearance between the ladder and any fixed objects. In many towers, mating flanges, bolts, and other objects intrude on this space. Operators and manufacturers are holding their collective breath as they await a ruling that may require ladder relocation in hundreds, if not thousands, of towers.
Newsletter Subscriptions
Newsletter Subscriptions
Your source for technology news and industry information
Questions & Discussion
Questions & Discussion
CR4: Q&A and discussion for the engineering, scientific, and technical community
Product Alerts
Product Alerts
Receive e-mail updates on new products and suppliers
Enginering News
Engineering News
Engineering and scientific news from hundreds
of sources
Events
Online Trade Shows + Events
Featuring the latest industry news, educational presentations from industry leaders, and product and technical content presented by participating manufacturer exhibitors.
Call for Speakers — submit your proposal
Product Announcements
Product Announcements
New and featured products from manufacturers and suppliers
Follow GlobalSpec On . . .  Facebook    Facebook
Feedback | Media Kit | Forward to a Friend
March 18, 2013 - Volume 3 Issue 1
© 2013 IHS. IHS, the IHS globe design, GlobalSpec, SpecSearch and The Engineering Web are registered trademarks of IHS, 30 Tech Valley Drive, Suite 102, East Greenbush, NY 12061 - 800.261.2052. All other products, company names, or other marks appearing in this e-newsletter are the trademarks and property of their respective owners.

St Louis Renewable Energy Sponsor Links

Subscribe to -St Louis Green Feed by Email

Connect with Scotts Contracting

FB FB Twitter Google Plus Tumblr LinkedIn Blog Blog Blog Blog Pinterest

Featured Post

10 Simple Ways To Boycott Monsanto

 10 Simple Ways To Boycott Monsanto : Source: Natural Revolution Org.